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New rules to access La Pomme d’Or

La Pomme d"Or - Fred Maltais

La Pomme d”Or – Fred Maltais

La Pomme d’Or

Every winter, skilled climbers take on the Pomme d’Or, a spectacular and perilous rock face along Rivière Malbaie. For permission to climb this ice wall in the park, you’ll need an access permit. Refer to Reservation Terms and Conditions for all the details.

Climbers must be in excellent physical condition and totally independent, since the ice wall is about 30 km from the closest telephone and off the park’s network of roads and trails. Under good weather conditions, it takes a full day of snowshoeing or off-trail skiing to reach the site.

If you are independent, climbing the Pomme d’Or requires a minimum stay of 3 days in the park.

  • Day 1: 30 km of snowshoeing or off-trail skiing to get to the foot of the cliff;
  • Day 2: climb the ice wall and return to base camp;
  • Day 3: 30 km of snowshoeing or off-trail skiing to return to your car.

We strongly recommend bringing a satellite telephone or a SPOT-type emergency message device. There is no emergency telephone on the site in the winter and the cell phone network does not serve the park’s territory.

http://www.sepaq.com/pq/hgo/index.dot?language_id=1

 

Location

La Pommed D’or is located approximately 2.5 hours east of Quebect City. The nearest decent sized town is Malbaie, Quebec. You enter the Parc de Haute Gorges I believe and drive as far as they will allow, before you begin your ski approach.

Administrative Guidelines and Obtaining a Backcountry Access Permit

It is mandatory to hold an Access Permit to climb the Pomme d’Or. To get one, you must apply in writing by filling out the appropriate form.

Applying for a Pomme d’Or Access Permit for Stays of More Than One Day

Once your itinerary is ready, you understand the associated risks and you consider yourself ready to assume them, you must fill out the Backcountry Access Permit Application form. Each member of the group must individually fill out the form. However, all applications for the same expedition must be sent in one mailing to the administrative office of the Parc national des Hautes-Gorges-de-la-Rivière-Malbaie.

Each application is analysed to make sure that the expedition respects instructions related to the mission of the national parks and that it will take place in the targeted sector. If your application is in order and the reception capacity has not been reached, a confirmation will be sent.

Allow for a 7-days waiting period from the time we receive your Pomme d’Or Access Permit Application. The cost is $10 /pers./night (maximum 8 nights), in addition to the park entry fee. These fees must be paid in full by credit card or cheque prior to your stay.

Modifications

If you wish to modify the stay dates or replace members of your team, you must do so at least 72 hours prior to arrival by directly contacting the administrative office of the park concerned.

Cancellation

If you want to cancel your stay, you must do so at least 72 hours prior to arrival by directly contacting the administrative office of the park concerned. No refunds will be granted for a cancellation made less than 72 hours prior to arrival.

Contact Information for the Administrative Office

Your Safety, Your Responsibility

Before submitting an application for authorization to climb the Pomme d’Or, you must be aware that help is far away and that your safety is your responsibility. Adequate preparation is required. First ask yourself if you have the skills, abilities and fitness level to undertake this kind of expedition. Climbing the Pomme d’Or involves certain risks, and it’s important to know what they are so you can prepare for them and be ready to react appropriately.

We invite you to consult our tip sheets about activities and stays offered by Société des établissements de plein air du Québec (Sépaq). The Fédération québécoise de la montagne et de l’escalade can help you plan your stay and your activities safely. Don’t hesitate to contact them.

No patrols are made at this time of year in this part of the territory. Emergency services are far away and access to the Pomme d’Or is particularly difficult. For incidents requiring immediate care or evacuation, wait time can be very long (sometimes several days). The isolation of this sector means that there is no cell phone service. A first aid kit and knowledge of how to apply first aid in remote areas are essential in emergency situations.

Costs related to search and rescue operations are solely the responsibility of the recipient. We strongly recommend checking whether or not your insurance company covers these costs. Otherwise, some private companies, such as Airmédic, offer the possibility of benefiting from such services by becoming a member of their organization.

No verifications will be made as to your return. It is your responsibility to give someone you trust a copy of your itinerary, making sure to indicate the date and times of your return and instructing the person to contact emergency services (911) in the event of your absence.

In Harmony with Nature

Minimizing our impact on the natural environment is a duty. The behavior you adopt during your stay at the park must constantly be guided by the desire to preserve the integrity of nature and our surroundings so that other climbers can fully enjoy the same privilege.

Parcs Québec considers the application of Leave no trace principles as the reference for behaviours in the national parks.

Number of People in the Group

For safety reasons, it is recommended to go in groups of a minimum of 3 people. To minimize disturbance and impacts on the natural environment.

Campfires

It is prohibited to make fires in the back country. Bring a camp stove for cooking.

– Source: PARCS QUÉBEC / PARC NATIONAL DES HAUTES-GORGES-DE-LA-RIVIÈRE-MALBAIE


Ice Climbing Nova Scotia

Where will your next road trip be heading? Ouray? Canmore? Norway?  If you’re looking to break out of that NH/NY/VT routine but don’t want to drop the coin on a flight out west or to Europe, why not check out the climbing in Nova Scotia?  It may be 12 hours by car from Boston, but battling the tides and the maritime climate provides an adventure setting unlike anyplace else in the northeast.

Roger Fage, a Nova Scotia local, has just put out the second version of his ice guide for climbing in Nova Scotia. The original version is available in the traditional, printed format, but Roger has something else in mind for this version of the guide.  Instead of sending it off to be printed, he’s come up with the following plan:

“So here’s how it works, we’re on the honor system.  You can download it at your ease, and then, depending on your level of happiness (from the quality of guide) and current income, donate to the sponsorship fund on a sliding scale.

If you’re poor/student in debt (but let’s be realistic if you’re poor/student you probably can’t afford to ice climb) pay what you can.  If you’ve got more, the guide costs 0.01% of your total income.  ie your net income is $100,000 the sponsorship fee is $10…and so on!  Or just download it and be indebted to me for life/pay when you can.

Please do not print off the entire guide.  Put it on your iphone and bring it with you, or print off individual pages on scrap paper.
Paper = Less Trees = Warmer Earth = Less Ice = Sadness.

Siren Song WI5 – FA Roger Fage and Matthew Peck

The guide is available for download here: Ice Pirate’s Guide to Nova Scotia.  Should you download the guide, please be respectful of the work Roger has put into compiling this great resource and contribute what you can.
Roger’s work was made possible by Climb Nova Scotia.  Be sure to check out their page for information about the 2012 Nova Scotia Ice Climbing Festival!