High Peaks Parking Problem

Discussion in 'New York - North' started by mrdeadpt, Feb 4, 2019.

.

Access  -  Events  -  Discussions  -  Reports  -  Partners  -  Used Gear  -  Gear  -   Lost & Found



  1. mrdeadpt

    mrdeadpt Member

    So, a buddy just got back from climbing in the High Peaks area over this last weekend. He says NY State Troopers were ticketing vehicles parked at the Chapel Pond "overlook", just above the pond itself--and vehicles parked in the trailhead parking area closest to Roaring Brook Falls. I thought this sounded totally nuts. Has anyone else heard about this--or have you been ticketed in those parking areas?
     
  2. mike gillam

    mike gillam Member

    They have changed some of the parking rules. There is no more "parking" on the road... and lots are marked with "No Parking" where it is prohibited. Tickets are being given for people parking in prohibited areas/road. They are trying to relieve some of the congestion/danger. I was there over Mountainfest and did not have any issues with finding a parking spot, although, I would recommend an earlier start if it is a holiday weekend, or plan on walking a little further than normal.
     
  3. Tom DuBois

    Tom DuBois Active Member

    This is a complicated situation. Read up on details. Some in the NY State hierarchy may actually be "trying to relieve congestion and danger." But the "solutions" so far are poorly thought out, and have not been working.

    Users (mostly hikers, but some climbers as well) are simply parking farther away from their intended destinations, and walking further on the highway to get where they want to go. Direct local observations from Columbus Day weekend, when these policies were first introduced, show unequivocally that "congestion" (i.e., user numbers in the resource) has not been reduced, but traffic danger has been greatly increased as a result of more people walking further on the highway. This was the obvious outcome, predicted by locals who have watched this evolve for years.

    Adequate, safe, off-road parking, and face to face user education are part of a real solution. Climbers should advocate for a real solution at every opportunity.
     

Share This Page